Disk Utility User Guide

Click “Make” and choose a path to save your converted ISO. OS Platform: Mac OS X 10.7 or higher; Windows 10, 8.1, 8, 7, Vista, and XP. As its name indicated, AnyToISO is a flexible ISO maker for Mac and Windows that aims at creating ISO from everything, including files, folders, and CD/DVD/Blu-ray disks. Global Nav Open Menu Global Nav Close Menu; Apple; Shopping Bag +. Hybrid image (HFS+/ISO/UDF): This disk image is a combination of disk image formats and can be used with different file system standards, such as HFS, ISO, and UDF. Click Save, then click Done. Disk Utility creates the disk image file where you saved it in the Finder and mounts its disk icon on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar. When burning a DVD from an ISO file, if you are told the disc image file is too large you will need to use Dual Layer (DL) DVD Media. Check these things on the PC where you want to install Windows 10. For example, we use macOS Catalina with VMDK & ISO file for Virtualization purposes but in two different methods. And for installing it on a real Mac we use macOS Catalina DMG file or the file which you are getting from Mac App Store is much different than the VMDK file and ISO file. Because of the VMDK file and ISO file created by us.

You can use Disk Utility to create a disk image, which is a file that contains other files and folders.

Note: You can burn information to a CD or DVD using the Burn command in the Finder. See Burn CDs and DVDs.

Create a blank disk image for storage

You can create an empty disk image, add data to it, then use it to create disks, CDs, or DVDs.

  1. In the Disk Utility app on your Mac, choose File > New Image > Blank Image.

  2. Enter a filename for the disk image, add tags if necessary, then choose where to save it.

    This is the name that appears in the Finder, where you save the disk image file before opening it.

  3. In the Name field, enter the name for the disk image.

    This is the name that appears on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar, after you open the disk image.

  4. In the Size field, enter a size for the disk image.

  5. Click the Format pop-up menu, then choose the format for the disk:

    • If the disk image will be used with a Mac that has a solid state drive (SSD) and uses macOS 10.13 or later, choose APFS or APFS (Case-sensitive).

    • If the disk image will be used with a Mac with macOS 10.12 or earlier, choose Mac OS Extended (Journaled) or Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled).

    • If the disk image will be used with a Mac or Windows computer and is 32 GB or less, choose MS-DOS (FAT); if it’s over 32 GB, choose ExFAT.

  6. To encrypt the disk image, click the Encryption pop-up menu, then choose an encryption option.

  7. Click the Partitions pop-up menu, then choose a partition layout.

  8. Click the Image Format pop-up menu, then choose an option:

    • Sparse bundle disk image: Same as a sparse disk image (below), but the directory data for the image is stored differently. Uses the .sparsebundle file extension.

    • Sparse disk image: Creates an expandable file that shrinks and grows as needed. No additional space is used. Uses the .sparseimage file extension.

    • Read/write disk image: Allows you to add files to the disk image after it’s created. Uses the .dmg file extension.

    • DVD/CD master: Changes the size of the image to 177 MB (CD 8 cm). Uses the .cdr file extension.

  9. Click Save, then click Done.

    Disk Utility creates the disk image file where you saved it in the Finder and mounts its disk icon on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar.

  10. In the Finder, copy your files to the mounted disk image, then eject it.

  11. Restore the disk image to a disk.

    For more information about disk image types, see the manual (man) page for hdiutil.

Create a disk image from a disk or connected device

You can create a disk image that includes the data and free space on a physical disk or connected device, such as a USB device. For example, if a USB device or volume is 80 GB with 10 GB of data, the disk image will be 80 GB in size and include data and free space. You can then restore that disk image to another volume.

  1. In the Disk Utility app on your Mac, select a disk, volume, or connected device in the sidebar.

  2. Choose File > New Image, then choose “Image from [device name].”

  3. Enter a filename for the disk image, add tags if necessary, then choose where to save it.

    This is the name that appears in the Finder, where you save the disk image file before opening it.

  4. Click the Format pop-up menu, then choose an option:

    • Read-only: The disk image can’t be written to, and is quicker to create and open.

    • Compressed: Compresses data, so the disk image is smaller than the original data. The disk image is read-only.

    • Read/write: Allows you to add files to the disk image after it’s created.

    • DVD/CD master: Can be used with third-party apps. It includes a copy of all sectors of the disk image, whether they’re used or not. When you use a master disk image to create other DVDs or CDs, all data is copied exactly.

  5. To encrypt the disk image, click the Encryption pop-up menu, then choose an encryption option.

  6. Click Save, then click Done.

    Disk Utility creates the disk image file where you saved it in the Finder and mounts its disk icon on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar.

Important: Don’t create a disk image of a disk that you believe to be failing or that contains corrupted information. The disk image may not serve as a reliable backup.

For technical information about creating a restore disk image, see the Apple Software Restore (ASR) manual (man) page.

Create a disk image from a folder or connected device

You can create a disk image that contains the contents of a folder or connected device, such as a USB device. This method doesn’t copy a device’s free space to the disk image. For example, if a USB device or volume is 80 GB with 10 GB of data, the disk image will be 10 GB in size and include only data, not free space. You can then restore that disk image to another volume.

  1. In the Disk Utility app on your Mac, choose File > New Image, then choose Image from Folder.

  2. Select the folder or connected device in the dialog that appears, then click Open.

  3. Enter a filename for the disk image, add tags if necessary, then choose where to save it.

    This is the name that appears in the Finder, where you save the disk image file before opening it.

  4. To encrypt the disk image, click the Encryption pop-up menu, then choose an encryption option.

  5. Click the Image Format pop-up menu, then choose an option:

    • Read-only: The disk image can’t be written to, and is quicker to create and open.

    • Compressed: Compresses data, so the disk image is smaller than the original data. The disk image is read-only.

    • Read/write: Allows you to add files to the disk image after it’s created.

    • DVD/CD master: Can be used with third-party apps. It includes a copy of all sectors of the disk image, whether they’re used or not. When you use a master disk image to create other DVDs or CDs, all data is copied exactly.

    • Hybrid image (HFS+/ISO/UDF): This disk image is a combination of disk image formats and can be used with different file system standards, such as HFS, ISO, and UDF.

  6. Click Save, then click Done.

    Disk Utility creates the disk image file where you saved it in the Finder and mounts its disk icon on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar.

For technical information about creating a restore disk image, see the Apple Software Restore (ASR) manual (man) page.

Create a secure disk image

If you have confidential documents that you don’t want others to see without your permission, you can put them in an encrypted disk image.

Note: If you want to protect the contents of the system disk, turn on FileVault using the FileVault pane of Security & Privacy Preferences.

  1. In the Disk Utility app on your Mac, choose File > New Image > Blank Image.

  2. Enter a filename for the disk image, add tags if necessary, then choose where to save it.

    This is the name that appears in the Finder, where you save the disk image file before opening it.

  3. In the Name field, enter the name for the disk image.

    This is the name that appears on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar, after you open the disk image.

  4. In the Size field, enter a size for the disk image.

  5. Click the Format pop-up menu, then choose a format:

    • If you’re using the encrypted disk image with a Mac computer using macOS 10.13 or later, choose APFS or APFS (Case-sensitive).

    • If you’re using the encrypted disk image with a Mac computer using macOS 10.12 or earlier, choose Mac OS Extended (Journaled) or Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled).

  6. Click the Encryption pop-up menu, then choose an encryption option.

  7. Enter and re-enter a password to unlock the disk image, then click Choose.

    WARNING: If you forget this password, you won’t be able to open the disk image and view any of the files.

  8. Use the default settings for the rest of the options:

    • Click the Partitions pop-up menu, then choose Single partition - GUID Partition Map.

    • Click the Image Format pop-up menu, then choose “read/write” disk image.

  9. Click Save, then click Done.

    Disk Utility creates the disk image file where you saved it in the Finder and mounts its disk icon on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar.

  10. In the Finder , copy the documents you want to protect to the disk image.

  11. If you want to erase the original documents so they can’t be recovered, drag them to the Trash, then choose Finder > Empty Trash.

When you’re finished using the documents on the secure disk image, be sure to eject the disk image. As long as it’s available on your desktop, anyone with access to your computer can use the documents on it.

To access the data in a disk image, double-click it. It appears on your desktop, and you can add, remove, and edit files on it just as you would with a disk.

See alsoAdd a checksum to a disk image using Disk Utility on MacVerify that a disk image’s data isn’t corrupted using Disk Utility on MacRestore a disk image to a disk using Disk Utility on MacConvert a disk image to another format using Disk Utility on Mac

Looking for the best ISO to USB burner for Mac? It's possible, but ISO is not native file type in Mac OS X or macOS environment, so you need to use workaround methods or employ a third-party ISO burning utility for Mac to get this done. This article covers three ways to burn ISO to USB stick on a Mac computer, powered by macOS Mojave, High Serria and earier Mac OS X systems.

The first thing you need to know is that you can't use an ISO disk image file on a Mac, since Apple primarily uses the DMG format. However, if you merely want to burn it to a disk, that's definitely possible. The only thing you can't do is run an ISO file on an Apple computer. Let's look at the various ways to burn ISO to USB on a Mac machine.

Part 1: How to Burn ISO to USB With Mac Terminal Software

Terminal is Apple's command line equivalent of Command Prompt in Windows and Terminal in Linux. Using this command line utility, you can burn an ISO file to an external DVD or USB disk. If you did not t have any experience with text command, then this is not recommended because it is too risky to damage the local disk with wrong input. Terminal allows you to do several system-level operations, so don't input anything other than the commands specified in the process outline shown below:

Step 1: Click Terminal icon from the Dock. Or Go to the Applications folder on Mac and find the Terminal app in Utilities folder.

Macos 10.13 High Sierra Download

File

Step 2: Copy the ISO file in a convenient location so your command doesn't have to be too long. Saving it to desktop or downloads folder is usually a good idea. Make sure you remember the name of the ISO file because it will be used in the command.

Step 3: If your ISO file is in your Desktop, then run the following command (press Enter after typing the command): cd desktop

Step 4: Now run the following command (hit Enter after typing): hdiutil burn filename.iso

Step 5: Once you run the command, your ISO file will be burned to the USB drive in your default optical drive. If you haven't inserted a disk, you will be prompted to do so. There is no need to run the command again after inserting the USB.

Cons:

  • Dangerous and not safe for beginners .
  • Sharp learning curve.
  • Bad support for USB 2.0 device.
  • USB not bootable.

If you want to avoid any kind of command line work and if you're running one of the newer versions of macOS, then it's better to use a third-party software like the one described in Part 2 below.

Microsoft Iso File For Mac

Part 2: Easily Burn ISO to USB on Mac via UUByte Software (Bootable USB Creator)

Sofware being powered by a graphics user interface are always welcomed because of user friendly operation. So the second suggestion in here is UUByte ISO burner software called ISO Editor for Mac. It is popularly regarded as the best ISO burning software for Mac. It allows you to burn, extract, edit, copy and create ISO almost as if it was a native file format on Mac. The utility has been fully tested on a wide range of storage media brands as well as all versions of macOS and Mac OS X.

The biggest advantage is that you do not need any technical expertise whatsoever to use this software. It is highly intuitive, and in a matter of minutes you can burn your ISO to USB or DVD. More importantly, the USB is bootable in default. This flexibility makes it the most user-friendly Mac app for handling ISO disk images in a number of ways. The next section shows you how to easily and quickly burn any ISO file to a disk or drive to create bootable USB on your Mac.

Key Features of ISO Editor for Mac

  • Designed by great UI.
  • Powerful Burning options.
  • Able to make bootable USB or DVD.
  • Support the latest macOS Mojave and High Serria.
  • Include other useful ISO tools such as edit, extract and create.
Mac

Step 1: Download UUByte ISO Burner for Mac

Download and install ISO Editor for Mac to your computer and launch the program. Click on the Burn module on the first page, which will take you to the ISO burning utility.

Step 2: Insert USB Drive on Mac and Import ISO Image

Insert a USB flash drive into your Mac. Select the ISO file to be burned to the media. If you want a different partition style or file system, make those changes on this page. If you don't know what they mean, leave them in default mode.

Step 3: Start Burning ISO to USB on Mac

Virtual

Click Burn and the ISO file will be burned to USB drive in around 5 minutes. Please wait and be patient. Make sure the computer not going into sleep mode during the burning process.

UUByte ISO Editor for Mac boasts a 95% burn success rate, so no wasted disks or wasted time when you use this software. The software's reliability, flexibility and speed have made this the go-to Mac application for handling ISO disk image files.

Part 3: Disk Utility - The Default ISO to USB Buner (Solid for Old Macs)

Mac

Disk Utility is a built-in tool that comes with Mac OS X and macOS. Using this function, you can easily burn your ISO to a disk after mounting it. Disk Utility is primarily meant to view and repair hard drives and other drives, but also has added functionality. Follow the process below to get your ISO burned to a writable DVD or CD.

Step 1: Go to the Applications folder using Finder or by clicking the shortcut on the bottom right of your screen. From there, go into the Utilities folder and click on Disk Utility to launch the app.

Step 2: Open your ISO file and mount it as a virtual drive. This is done automatically when you click on File >Open Disk Image… in the top menu.

Step 3: When you see your ISO file in the left panel, that means it was mounted properly. You can now insert an USB and click on the Burn option to burn the target ISO file to the USB drive.

This method is only meant for OS X 10.10 and earlier versions. With Mac OS X 10.11 El Capitan, Apple removed the ability to burn ISO to a USB. If you have one of these higher versions, you can try the above methods.

Files

Summary

To be honest, Burning ISO to USB was not challenging at all on Mac in the past. But the situation was changed since the release of macOS. Many apps was not supported or updated to Mojave or High Serria. So for the new Mac computer, UUByte ISO Editor is the best option out there in 2019.

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